Obsolete Automotive!

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Obsolete Automotive MGB Parts Canada
obsolete automotive
The Austin-Healey 3000 is a British sports car built from 1959 to 1967, and is the best known of the "big Healey" models. The car's bodywork was made by Jensen Motors, and the vehicles were assembled by Austin-Healey at the Abingdon works.
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Obsolete Automotive MGB Parts Canada
obsolete automotive
The Triumph TR6 (1968–76) is a British six-cylinder sports car and the best-seller of the TR range built by Triumph when production ended in July 1976.
Obsolete Automotive MGB Parts Canada
obsolete automotive
The MGB is a two-door sports car manufactured and marketed by the British Motor Corporation (BMC), later British Leyland, as a four-cylinder, soft-top roadster
obsolete automotive
The MGA is a sports car that was produced by MG from 1955 to 1962
The MGA replaced the MG TF 1500 Midget and represented a complete styling break from MG's earlier sports cars. Announced on 26 September 1955[3] the car was officially launched at the Frankfurt Motor Show. A total of 101,081 units were sold through the end of production in July 1962, the vast majority of which were exported. Only 5869 cars were sold on the home market, the lowest percentage of any British car. It was replaced by the MGB.

Obsolete Automotive MGB Parts Canada
obsolete automotive
The MG Midget is a small two-seater sports car that was produced by MG from 1961 to 1979. It revived a name that had been used on earlier models such as the MG M-type, MG D-type, MG J-type and MG T-type.
obsolete automotive
The Triumph Spitfire is a small English two-seat sports car, introduced at the London Motor Show in 1962.[3] The vehicle was based on a design produced for Standard-Triumph in 1957 by Italian designer Giovanni Michelotti. The platform for the car was largely based upon the chassis, engine, and running gear of the Triumph Herald saloon, and was manufactured at the Standard-Triumph works at Canley, in Coventry. As was typical for cars of this era, the bodywork was fitted onto a separate structural chassis, but for the Spitfire, which was designed as an open top or convertible sports car from the outset, the X-frame chassis was reinforced for additional rigidity by the use of structural components within the bodywork. The Spitfire was provided with a manual hood for weather protection, the design improving to a folding hood for later models. Factory-manufactured hard-tops were also available.
obsolete automotive
The Austin-Healey Sprite is a small open sports car which was produced in the United Kingdom from 1958 to 1971. The Sprite was announced to the press in Monte Carlo by the British Motor Corporation on 20 May 1958, just before that year's Monaco Grand Prix. It was intended to be a low-cost model that "a chap could keep in his bike shed", yet be the successor to the sporting versions of the pre-war Austin Seven. The Sprite was designed by the Donald Healey Motor Company, with production being undertaken at the MG factory at Abingdon. It first went on sale at a price of £669, using a tuned version of the Austin A-Series engine and as many other components from existing cars as possible to keep costs down.
obsolete automotive
The Triumph TR3 is a sports car produced between 1955 and 1962 by Standard-Triumph in England. The facelifted variant, popularly but unofficially known as the TR3A, entered production in 1957 and the final version, unofficially the TR3B, was produced in 1962.

Obsolete Automotive MGB Parts Canada
obsolete automotive
The Triumph TR4 is a British sports car which was produced by the Triumph Motor Company from 1961 to 1965. Code named "Zest" during development, the car was based on the chassis and drivetrain of the previous TR sports cars, but with a modern Michelotti styled body. 40,253 cars were built during production years. The TR4 proved very successful and continued the rugged, "hairy-chested" image that the previous TRs had enjoyed.
obsolete automotive
The Triumph TR4A was built between 1965 and 1967[2] by the Triumph Motor Company in the United Kingdom. The TR4A was an evolution of the TR4, updated with a new chassis. It was hoped the new, but more complex, independent rear suspension would address the buying public's desire for more comfortable riding sports cars. This version has an "IRS" badge on the rear. It has been estimated that 75 percent of TR4A were built with IRS.[citation needed] In 1965 the TR4A IRS sold in the UK for approximately £968, with wire wheels being another £36, overdrive £51, heater £13 and seat belts £4each;[3] it sold for just under $2500 in the United States.
obsolete automotive
The Triumph TR8 is an eight-cylinder version of the "wedge-shaped" Triumph TR7 sports car, designed by Harris Mann, and manufactured by British Leyland (BL), through its Jaguar/Rover/Triumph (JRT) division. Because of its outstanding performance, the TR8 was often dubbed the "English Corvette".[3] The majority of TR8s were sold in the United States and Canada.
obsolete automotive
The Triumph TR7 is a sports car manufactured from September 1974 to October 1981 by the Triumph Motor Company (which was part of British Leyland) in the United Kingdom. It was initially produced at the Speke, Liverpool factory,[2][3][4] moving to Canley, Coventry in 1978 and then finally to the Rover Solihull plant in 1980. The car was launched in the United States in January 1975, with its UK home market debut in May 1976. The UK launch was delayed at least twice because of high demand for the vehicle in the US, with final sales of new TR7s continuing into 1982.
obsolete automotive
The Triumph TR250, built during the same period for the North American market, was nearly identical to the TR5. But, because of price pressures and emission regulations the TR250 was fitted with twin Zenith-Stromberg carburettors rather than the Lucas fuel injection system. The reasons for this difference came down to price pressures of the American market, and tighter emissions regulations. The TR250's straight-six engine delivered 111 bhp (81 kW), 39 bhp less than the TR5; 0–60 mph (0–97 km/h) acceleration took 10.6 seconds.[2][5] In 1968, the TR250 sold in North America for approximately $3,395, with wire wheels being another $118, overdrive $175 and air conditioning another $395.[6]
obsolete automotive
Jaguar was de-merged from British Leyland and was listed on the London Stock Exchange in 1984, becoming a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index until it was acquired by Ford in 1990.[9] Jaguar has, in recent years, manufactured cars for the British Prime Minister, the most recent delivery being an XJ in May 2010.[10] The company also holds royal warrants from Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Charles.[11]
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